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Cumulus Radio Threatens Termination of Hosts Over Election Fraud Claims

The memo comes after both chambers of Congress met Jan. 6 to certify the Electoral College votes cast and on the heels of a mob of people breaching security at the U.S. Capitol and illegally entering both the House and Senate, as well as ransacking congressional offices.

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Cumulus apparently has drawn a line in the sand with its pool of conservative commentators.

With Democrats Joe Biden and Kamala Harris set to be sworn in as the next president and vice president of the United States on Jan. 20, President Donald Trump and his allies have seemingly exhausted all possible avenues to get the results of the 2020 presidential election reversed. But even up to now, that hasn’t stopped many from across conservative media from echoing the thoughts of President Trump and claiming the election was rigged and stolen.

In an article published by the Washington Post on Monday, one Cumulus executive is trying to nip that line of thinking in the bud.

According to the Post, Brian Philips, executive vice president of content for Cumulus, issued an internal memo saying Cumulus and Westwood One would not tolerate further claims that President Trump has some sort of path to a second term in the White House. And that, “If you transgress this policy, you can expect to separate from the company immediately.”

The memo comes after both chambers of Congress met Jan. 6 to certify the Electoral College votes cast and on the heels of a mob of people breaching security at the U.S. Capitol and illegally entering both the House and Senate, as well as ransacking congressional offices.

The Post article mentions the names of a few popular conservative personalities claiming to be employees of Cumulus or Westwood One. In particular, Ben Shapiro and Mark Levin.

Jeremy Boreing, who co-founded The Daily Wire with Shapiro and is an executive producer of The Ben Shapiro Show, made it clear the memo won’t apply to Shapiro.

Levin told media watchdog NewsBusters, “I never received that memo, and my crew never received that memo. This story is done by a reporter who has never spoken to me – ever.” He added if he did in fact receive that memo “I would make sure the entire nation would hear about it.” He added “I would like a correction and an apology from the Post, but I won’t hold my breath.”

There’s been no word at least by hosts employed by Cumulus at the local level who have spoken out about the memo.

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Minnesota Talk Station Without Program Director

The station has recently undergone some changes with the news that morning-drive personality Dave Lee will retire in April.

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Minnesota’s News Talk 830 WCCO is without a program director following the sudden departure of John Hanson last week, according to an internal memo.

“Reaching out this afternoon to notify the staff that John Hanson is no longer with the company, effective today,” said Shannon Knoepke, the senior vice president, and Twin Cities market manager for Entercom, which owns the station.

Hanson, who grew up in the Twin Cities, helped launch KSTP-TV’s Twin Cities Live in 2008. Five years later, he left the show to program a sports radio station in Kansas City.

Hanson returned to Minnesota in 2018 to accept a programming job at WCCO. The station has recently undergone some changes with the news that morning-drive personality Dave Lee will retire in April.

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Morano Pays Tribute to Larry King

“I don’t really have the vocabulary to express my deep sadness at the passing of Larry King,” Morano said. “I can’t begin to describe the impact that he has had on the world of radio, cable news and broadcasting in general.”

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Photo by Gage Skidmore CC BY-SA 2.0.

Broadcasting legend and interviewer extraordinaire Larry King passed away Saturday, January 23rd at the age of 87. An emotional Frank Morano, host of The Other Side of Midnight on WABC, paid tribute to King during his opening monologue on Monday, saying King’s death “Marks the end of an era in broadcasting”.

Morano began his tribute by discussing King’s impact on the world of broadcasting.

“I don’t really have the vocabulary to express my deep sadness at the passing of Larry King,” Morano said. “I can’t begin to describe the impact that he has had on the world of radio, cable news and broadcasting in general. Watching his work, sometimes he would make you laugh, sometimes he would make you cry, sometimes he would surprise you and then sometimes he would make you scratch your head. But that was Larry. Because of that, it is a struggle to find what made Larry King so great. I have come to the conclusion that it wasn’t one thing, but a combination of many, many things.”

Morano adds that King had many similarities with another television icon, Alex Trebek.

“There are a lot of people in television or radio that can find success for a moment,” Morano said. “But to have longevity and be on the air for literal decades, you have to be relatable to audiences. You have to be ‘just a regular guy from the neighborhood’. You have to be curious and you have to be humble. Both Larry and Alex had those qualities and that’s why people loved them.”

While Morano does compare King to Trebek, he said it was King’s differences from other broadcasters that set him apart.

“Let’s be honest. Larry King was no Ken Doll,” he said. “He would wear those suspenders that nobody else would think about wearing. He didn’t look like the picture of somebody you thought was supposed to be on TV. He did not ask the same erudite questions that everyone else was asking. No, Larry King was different and that’s what made him so special.”

Morano closes his monologue by crediting King with shaping the modern news format, saying that his death leaves a void in the world of broadcasting,

“I didn’t know Larry personally aside from meeting him a couple of times for about ten seconds, but I feel like I lost a friend,” Morano said. “He was one of the people that helped define and create modern day cable news and call-in radio formats. That era has closed with his passing. That is really sad.”

Later in his program, Morano interviewed King’s producer Tammy Haddad. Morano also invited listeners to call in and share their memories of King throughout the program. In addition, Morano played some rare clips of King from his career, but stopped short of devoting the entire four hour show to him because, “I don’t think Larry would have wanted it that way”.

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Amy Anderson Makes Jump from TV to Talk Radio

Anderson will be paired with Will Sterrett who was hired in 2019 after spending years as an afternoon news anchor.

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Former television news anchor Amy Anderson has been hired to co-host Kansas City’s Morning News on Entercom’s KMBZ Radio. Anderson will be paired with Will Sterrett who was hired in 2019 after spending years as an afternoon news anchor.

“Amy is a familiar face and is well-known in her hometown of Kansas City, spending nearly 18 years working as a television news anchor and reporter for KCTV-5,” Entercom said in a statement.

Before working in Kansas City, Anderson worked in Joplin, MO, and Orlando, FL.

“Amy brings strong news ‘chops’ and news sense to the KMBZ newsroom, and will form a power team with Will Sterrett, building on KMBZ’s tradition of delivering credible, factual news to listeners in Kansas City and beyond,” a station website post read.

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