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Washington Times Retracts Piece Connecting Capitol Rioters to Antifa

The article adds that Antifa infiltrated a group of President Trump’s supporters that stormed the Capitol. However, XRVision, a facial recognition company, demanded that The Washington Times retract its piece and alleged that it was completely false.

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After publishing an article claiming that a facial recognition company identified members of the left-wing Antifa movement, The Washington Times appeared to retract the piece.

The article adds that Antifa infiltrated a group of President Trump’s supporters that stormed the Capitol. However, XRVision, a facial recognition company, demanded that The Washington Times retract its piece and alleged that it was completely false, according to an email statement sent to The Hill.

“XRVision takes pride in its technology’s precision and deems the Washington Times publication as outright false, misleading, and defamatory,” the statement read.

“Our attorney is in contact with the Washington Times and has instructed them to ‘Cease and Desist’ from any claims regarding sourcing of XRVision analytics, to retract the current claims, and publish an apology.”

Facing legal action from XRVision, The Washington Times have re-uploaded the story with a correction and apology. “An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that XRVision facial recognition software identified Antifa members among rioters who stormed the Capitol Wednesday. XRVision did not identify any Antifa members. The Washington Times apologizes to XRVision for the error.”

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Alex Jones Request to Have Charges Dropped Denied

The Sandy Hook victims’ parents sued Jones in Travis County, where his popular, far-right website Infowars is based. They alleged that Jones defamed them and caused emotional distress when he repeatedly claimed the shooting and subsequent news coverage of the attack were hoaxes.

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Photo by Sean P. Anderson CC BY 2.0.

InfoWars owner and show host Alex Jones had his request rejected by the Texas Supreme Court. Jones wanted to have his four defamation lawsuits against him dismissed, which stems from parents whose children were killed in the 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut.

The Sandy Hook victims’ parents sued Jones in Travis County, where his popular, far-right website Infowars is based. They alleged that Jones defamed them and caused emotional distress when he repeatedly claimed the shooting and subsequent news coverage of the attack were hoaxes.

Ruling over the matter was made without comment from the justices, who upheld decisions by two lower courts allowing the lawsuits to proceed. The suits against Jones cite various comments he made about the shooting, including that it was “a giant hoax” and a “false flag” intended to promote gun control measures. “Mr. Jones’ fantasy about a shadowy government conspiracy to murder first-graders and then exploit the event with the help of the media and actors is the very definition of ‘improbable,” lawyer Mark Bankston told the court.

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Washington Post and New York Times Regain White House Access

In October 2019, Trump canceled the White House subscriptions to two of the nation’s largest newspapers due to the former president’s longstanding feud with the media outlets, which he called “fake” and “corrupt.”

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During his time in office, former President Trump canceled the subscriptions to The New York Times and The Washington Post out of anger over his portrayal.

In October 2019, Trump canceled the White House subscriptions to two of the nation’s largest newspapers due to the former president’s longstanding feud with the media outlets, which he called “fake” and “corrupt.”

However, in President Biden’s first full day, both physical copies of both papers arrived at the White House.

Although both newspapers went over a year without their newspaper arriving at the White, both The New York Times and The Washington Post saw an increase in subscriptions and readership during the Trump administration. Furthermore, reporters at these media outlets became stars for their breaking news and aggressive coverage. Despite canceling the newspaper subscriptions, Trump still followed reporting on his administration in both papers. The former president often went on Twitter to lash out over stories about his administration, calling them unfair or untrue.

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Washington Post Recounts Instances of President Trump’s False or Misleading Claims

In their report, The Post counted one inaccurate claim per topic per venue, whether during a particular speech, tweet, or interview.

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Former President Trump’s time in office has come to an end after four years. The Washington Post decided to commemorate his departure by reporting on the 30,573 false or misleading claims during his time in office.

In their report, The Post counted one inaccurate claim per topic per venue, whether during a particular speech, tweet, or interview.

Of the many false claims that Trump stated during his time as president, one was where he took responsibility for the greatest economy in history. However, the Post noted that former Presidents Eisenhower, Johnson, and Clinton all were responsible for more considerable economic growth than Trump when using current metrics.

As President Trump was ready to depart from office, he recorded one last misleading claim that the Post reported on which was at the Andrews Air Force during his departure ceremony.

“We also got tax cuts, the largest tax cut, and reform in the history of our country, by far,” Trump said. Nonetheless, the Post reported something vastly different as they stated that former President Reagan’s tax cuts amounted to a significantly larger percentage of the gross domestic product.

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