Connect with us

News Print & Digital

Former New York Times Reporter Attacks the Newspaper After Departure

Despite the letter, McNeil wanted to put out an unfiltered statement regarding his departure, stating the pressure he received to resign.

Published

on

Photo by Joe Shlabotnik CC BY 2.0.

Former New York Times global health reporter Donald McNeil took to Medium as he wanted to provide his story of the events that led to his resignation. McNeil resigned in early February amid a race-related controversy.

Nonetheless, the ex-Times reporter apologized for his actions in his resignation letter after allegations came to light that he had made inappropriate comments about race and used a racial slur during a Times-sponsored 2019 student trip, where he served as a guide.

Despite the letter, McNeil wanted to put out an unfiltered statement regarding his departure, stating the pressure he received to resign.

“I’m publishing my thoughts here on Medium because I know journalists. We make America what it is — without a free press, democracy dies. But we’re still jackals,” McNeil wrote. “Since January 28, I’ve been a jackal circled by jackals.”

“It’s been quite baffling and painful for me to have people assume I’m a racist and believe that I said the ridiculous things I’m accused of saying — that ‘racism is over,’ that ‘white supremacy doesn’t exist,’ or ‘white privilege doesn’t exist,’ or that I defended the use of blackface or said horrible things about black teenagers in general.”

“Obviously, I badly misjudged my audience in Peru that year. I thought I was generally arguing in favor of open-mindedness and tolerance — but it clearly didn’t come across that way. And my bristliness makes me an imperfect pedagogue for sensitive teenagers. I do not see why their complaints should have ended my career at the Times two years later. But they did.”

In response to McNeil’s blog post, the Times didn’t have a comment on the matter. “We’re reviewing the posts and not commenting further for now,” a Times spokesperson said.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

News Print & Digital

Vox Media Acquires Cafe Studios

Cafe Studios’ content examines “how law and policy intercross with politics, news, business, history, and technology.” Now their eight podcasts will head to the Vox Media Podcast Network, one of the largest and fastest-growing mass media outlets.

Published

on

Vox Media announced in a press release that it would be acquiring Cafe Studios, which is co-founded by former U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York Preet Bharara and his brother Vinit Bharara.

Cafe Studios’ content examines “how law and policy intercross with politics, news, business, history, and technology.” Now their eight podcasts will head to the Vox Media Podcast Network, one of the largest and fastest-growing mass media outlets.

“Preet and his team at Cafe have built a successful podcast studio with a compelling perspective — and an equally impressive community of devoted listeners,” Vox Media Chairman, CEO, and co-founder Jim Bankoff said.

“Bringing Cafe into the Vox Media Podcast Network is aligned with our goal of delivering high-quality editorial content at scale and providing audiences highly relevant voices and insights.”

Cafe will function as part of the Vox Media Podcast Network with the former U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York and Executive Producer and Head of Content Tamara Sepper joining Vox Media.

Besides Bharara and Sepper, other podcast hosts, producers, and product developers will jump onboard the mass media company.

“This is an opportunity for tremendous growth with a company that shares in Cafe’s mission, values, and commitment to quality,” Bharara said.

“Our creators are bursting at the seams with plans for more thoughtful, educational content and, in Vox Media, we earn a partner with a large audience, strategic business, and a strong reach across text, video, and events.”

When it came to the detail of the financial agreement to the deal, terms weren’t disclosed.

Continue Reading

News Print & Digital

Reuters News Names New Editor in Chief

Alessandra Galloni will become the first woman to head the globe-spanning news agency in its 170-year history. The Rome-native is replacing the soon-to-be-retired Stephen J. Adler, who led the newsroom for the past decade.

Published

on

Reuters News is under new leadership as the media outlet announced in a press release that one of its top editors Alessandra Galloni as its next editor-in-chief.

Galloni will become the first woman to head the globe-spanning news agency in its 170-year history. The Rome-native is replacing the soon-to-be-retired Stephen J. Adler, who led the newsroom for the past decade.

“For 170 years, Reuters has set the standard for independent, trusted, and global reporting,” Galloni said. “It is an honor to lead a world-class newsroom full of talented, dedicated, and inspiring journalists.”

One of Galloni’s first tasks will have on her desk as the new editor-in-chief is to maintain a good relationship with Refinitiv.

The financial market data and infrastructure company were Reuters’ most significant customer. Last year Refinitiv accounted for more than half of the news agency’s $628 million in revenues.

April 19th will mark Galloni’s first day as editor-in-chief of Reuters News.

Continue Reading

News Print & Digital

Media Outlets Kept from Daunte Wright Shooting Press Conference

StarTribune reporter Andy Mannix tweeted that he and other reporters including a reporter with Minnesota Public Radio were excluded from the event after they waited for more than an hour to get in.

Published

on

Two Minnesota media outlets said they were locked out of a press conference Monday where law enforcement officials discussed the officer-involved shooting that led to the death of 20-year-old Daunte Wright.

StarTribune reporter Andy Mannix tweeted that he and other reporters including a reporter with Minnesota Public Radio were excluded from the event after they waited for more than an hour to get in.

StarTribune managing editor and VP Suki Dardarian confirmed that two out of three of her journalists, a photographer and writer, were barred from entering the conference. A StarTribune video reporter was let in.

“We have reached out to the city with our concerns and have not heard back as of yet,” Dardarian said. “The chief indicated a commitment to transparency. That begins with letting us in after inviting us to a press conference. And it would include allowing us to ask questions after sharing his statement.”

Minneapolis Public Radio also confirmed its reporters were prevented from attending the press conference.

“Credentialed MPR News journalists were not granted access to today’s press conference in Brooklyn Center. Direct access to official information is critical to full and accurate reporting, so we are hopeful that future press conferences are made accessible to all credentialed journalists,” an MPR spokesperson said via email.

Wright was shot after the officer meant to use a taser, but mistakenly drew her gun instead.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 Barrett News Media.