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Tedd Webb Passes Away

Webb co-hosted the morning show on WFLA Radio for 23 years before he retired in 2017.

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Photo by James Borchuck/Tampa Bay Times

Former WFLA Radio morning man Tedd Webb passed away Tuesday, the station’s Twitter account revealed, he was 72. Webb co-hosted the morning show for 23 years before he retired in 2017.

Webb broke into the Tampa market in 1963 as a DJ with WALT. Last week he told the Tampa Bay Times that he expected to die within a week after arbitrarily removing himself off kidney dialysis.

Last week, Tampa City Councilman Guido Maniscalco made a motion to honor Webb with a street sign.

“Tedd was an important part of NewsRadio WFLA and the Tampa Bay community for many years,” the station tweeted. “He will be deeply missed, and our thoughts & prayers are with his family.”

In 1999, Webb underwent a quadruple bypass operation and since then has struggled with congestive heart failure.

The station announced that Wednesday morning’s AM Tampa Bay program will honor Tedd’s life and legacy. Listeners are invited to participate and share their favorite memories throughout the morning.

“As we move forward, we will do our best to follow Tedd’s advice to always “live it up!” The station said.

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BNM Writers

Simone Says Media Fans the Flames of Racism

“Things are bad enough right now, but the media is making it worse,” Simone said on Tuesday’s edition of The Mark Simone Show heard on New York’s WOR. “Not every tragedy that happens is racially motivated.”

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Photo by Jenny Salita CC BY-ND 2.0.

Unlike some conservative radio hosts, Mark Simone readily admits that racism is a problem that needs to be addressed in America, but also calls on the media to stop “fanning the flames of racism”.

“Things are bad enough right now, but the media is making it worse,” Simone said on Tuesday’s edition of The Mark Simone Show heard on New York’s WOR. “Not every tragedy that happens is racially motivated. Some are and that needs to be addressed. But the media jumps to push a certain narrative and I think it’s dangerous.”

Simone uses the recent shooting death of African-American Daunte Wright by Caucasian police officer Kim Potter. According to reports, during a traffic stop Potter meant to taser Wright, who was allegedly resisting arrest, but instead mistakenly pulled her firearm and fatally shot Wright Potter has since resigned her position, and as of Wednesday morning, according to The New York Times, the shooting was ruled “an accidental discharge”.

“What happened was a horrible, tragic and stupid,” Simone said. “How does a 25 year veteran of the police force confuse a taser and a gun? That should not happen. It was an idiotic mistake and she should be held accountable to the fullest extent of the law. But was it racially motivated? I don’t think so.”

Simone blames the media for rushing to judgment before all the facts are known.

“I would ask them to stop it, but I know they won’t,” he said. “The media is married to the BLM movement. On the surface Black Lives Matter sounds like a positive thing, but in reality, when paired with the media, it is a dangerous combination that fans the flames of racism instead of settling them down.”

Simone adds that this coupling of the media with BLM leads to bias reporting.

“There have been 17 cops killed just this year,” he said. “In one of the most horrific videos I’ve seen, a police officer was shot and killed at a traffic stop by a man with an assault rifle. Why isn’t that video the lead story for Lester Holt and NBC News? Why doesn’t CNN or MSNBC cover that story? Because it doesn’t fit the narrative of racism. We all know that there is a small percentage of bad cops out there, but they treat everybody badly. They are overaggressive and demeaning. That’s just the way they act and that doesn’t change based on skin color.”

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News Radio

Mark Kaye Takes Over Rush Time Slot in Tulsa

Kaye is based in Jacksonville, Florida where he hosts a talk show on 104.5 WOVK. Kaye was a longtime morning show host on a CHR station before making the jump to news/talk.

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Radio stations around the country are still grappling with how to replace the late Rush Limbaugh. 102.3 KRMG in Tulsa, Oklahoma is opting to replace Limbaugh’s show with Mark Kaye.

Kaye is based in Jacksonville, Florida where he hosts a talk show on 104.5 WOVK. Kaye was a longtime morning show host on a CHR station before making the jump to news/talk.

“As a life-long fan of Rush Limbaugh, I am still adjusting to a world without his voice,” Kaye said. “Producing a daily show in ‘Rush’s timeslot’ is a daunting task for any broadcaster, but I am grateful to the leadership team at CMG along with 102.3 KRMG for placing their trust in me.”

Kaye’s political videos during the 2016 election, including the now famous “Hillary Clinton Song”, have been viewed by over 14 million people.

“Our stations across the country will greatly miss Rush,” CMG Radio EVP Rob Babin.” We’re pleased to have our own CMG talent to take over that show time in the Tulsa market who has a long successful track record of great ratings and building large audiences and is very compatible with the brand of entertaining and engaging programming that our listeners expect from 11:00 am to 2:00 pm.”

Both KRMG and WOVK are owned by Cox Media Group.

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News Print & Digital

Media Outlets Kept from Daunte Wright Shooting Press Conference

StarTribune reporter Andy Mannix tweeted that he and other reporters including a reporter with Minnesota Public Radio were excluded from the event after they waited for more than an hour to get in.

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Two Minnesota media outlets said they were locked out of a press conference Monday where law enforcement officials discussed the officer-involved shooting that led to the death of 20-year-old Daunte Wright.

StarTribune reporter Andy Mannix tweeted that he and other reporters including a reporter with Minnesota Public Radio were excluded from the event after they waited for more than an hour to get in.

StarTribune managing editor and VP Suki Dardarian confirmed that two out of three of her journalists, a photographer and writer, were barred from entering the conference. A StarTribune video reporter was let in.

“We have reached out to the city with our concerns and have not heard back as of yet,” Dardarian said. “The chief indicated a commitment to transparency. That begins with letting us in after inviting us to a press conference. And it would include allowing us to ask questions after sharing his statement.”

Minneapolis Public Radio also confirmed its reporters were prevented from attending the press conference.

“Credentialed MPR News journalists were not granted access to today’s press conference in Brooklyn Center. Direct access to official information is critical to full and accurate reporting, so we are hopeful that future press conferences are made accessible to all credentialed journalists,” an MPR spokesperson said via email.

Wright was shot after the officer meant to use a taser, but mistakenly drew her gun instead.

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